Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders

I finally read Lincoln in the Bardo, George Saunders's Man Booker Prize winner for 2017, and it was quite an experience. The book made a splash for its unusual theme and innovative style - it is written in a quasi-dramatic form and composed in part of quotes from history books and primary sources, including diaries of White House... Continue Reading →

Apricots and Wolfsbane by K.M. Pohlkamp

Lavinia Maud lies and murders, but she is also hopelessly in love, goes to church regularly, and gives shelter to a pair of orphaned siblings. In other words, the heroine of K.M. Pohlkamp’s Apricots and Wolfsbane may be a monster, but she is also adorable. Herself orphaned at a young age, Lavinia turns her passion... Continue Reading →

For the Winner by Emily Hauser

The second part of Emily Hauser’s Golden Apple trilogy, For the Winner, is a reimagining of the myth of Jason and the Argonauts. Like the first book of the series, For the Most Beautiful, it tells a popular story from a female perspective, something that is rare in Greek and many other mythological traditions. There... Continue Reading →

A Day of Fire

The destruction of the ancient city of Pompeii by Vesuvius in AD 79 has inspired countless works of fiction and non-fiction over the years, but when I heard Sophie Perinot (of The Medicis' Daughter fame) talk about A Day of Fire at this year's literary festival in Newburyport, it piqued my interest. Perinot is one... Continue Reading →

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